July 22, 2014
Every Canadian Novel Ever

1. Will the Cod Return, Or Must We Move to Toronto?

2. Only the Jews Know Montreal

3. The Next Three Chapters Are Set in the 1830s Bush For No Reason But Then We’ll Be Back to This 1970s University Women’s Studies Department

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Filed under: canada true 
July 22, 2014
blastedheath:

Tim Storrier (Australian, b. 1949), The Night Sun/ Starlight, 1995. Synthetic polymer paint on board, 39.5 x 49.5 cm.

blastedheath:

Tim Storrier (Australian, b. 1949), The Night Sun/ Starlight, 1995. Synthetic polymer paint on board, 39.5 x 49.5 cm.

(via roxygen)

July 22, 2014
brassmanticore:

Selimiye Mosque, Edirne
Photograph by James L. Stanfield
Soaring toward the heavens, the vast Selimiye Mosque in Edirne, Turkey, represents the pinnacle of [court architect] Sinan’s achievement. Light flooding through curtain walls illuminates geometric designs, arabesques, and phrases from the Koran. The mosque was built by Sinan in the 1570s for Selim II, Süleyman’s son and successor. Born in a Christian village in Anatolia, Sinan rose through the devsirme system, whereby Ottomans brought promising Christian youths to the court in Istanbul. They were educated, converted to Islam, and trained as Janissaries—elite infantry—or as administrators.
—From “The World of Süleyman the Magnificent,” November 1987, National Geographic magazine (X)

brassmanticore:

Selimiye Mosque, Edirne

Photograph by James L. Stanfield

Soaring toward the heavens, the vast Selimiye Mosque in Edirne, Turkey, represents the pinnacle of [court architect] Sinan’s achievement. Light flooding through curtain walls illuminates geometric designs, arabesques, and phrases from the Koran. The mosque was built by Sinan in the 1570s for Selim II, Süleyman’s son and successor. Born in a Christian village in Anatolia, Sinan rose through the devsirme system, whereby Ottomans brought promising Christian youths to the court in Istanbul. They were educated, converted to Islam, and trained as Janissaries—elite infantry—or as administrators.

—From “The World of Süleyman the Magnificent,” November 1987, National Geographic magazine (X)

July 22, 2014

When I renew my contract I’m going to try to negotiate for some vacation time or at least unpaid leave so that at least I have the chance to visit my family, if I can scrape the money together.  Even the South Asian workers get four to six weeks every year and a paid plane ticket to see their families, because people really need that.  They can’t begrudge me two weeks of unpaid leave per year, can they.

July 22, 2014

themindislimitless replied to your post “It has been five years I’ve been away and I have started to miss my…”

*hugs*

Thank you sweetie *hugs back*

July 22, 2014

It has been five years I’ve been away and I have started to miss my family.  Really viscerally miss them, it’s dragging me down and there’s no way I can see them any time soon.  It’ll probably be years and when I go back I’ll remember why I got the hell out.

July 21, 2014
"

Romantic love, as we understand it, is a colonial construct. It is an all-consuming, possessive, lifelong, monogamous endeavor that works to sustain capitalism and white supremacist heteropatriarchy via the nuclear family. We are told that this romantic love is essential, shaping it as a self-fulfilling prophecy. Were we to sustain ourselves on self-love, platonic love, and love of community, what could change? We could see the beauty of our interdependence, rather than individuals competing for higher wages and standards of living at the expense of each other. The formation of families, rather than communities, creates hierarchies of which people are worthy and deserving of our attention, protection and devotion. With a restructuring of romantic love as comparable to community/platonic/self-love, we begin to prioritize the care and livelihood of entire larger groups of people as equally important as our romantic partner/s.

In her piece “Moving Toward the Ugly: A Politic Beyond Desirability,” Mia Mingus pushes us to transcend a beauty binary and move towards what she calls magnificence, an embracement of the Ugly and the diversity of the body—of every body. Mingus frames beauty as an inherently exclusionary construction that erases people of color, trans and gender non-conforming folks, and disabled folks, specifically. With this in mind, I am still working through what it means to be ugly and be beautiful, and better understand my investment in beauty. If being “not beautiful” means not being or feeling “love-worthy” and if “love-worthy” means humanity, what does it mean for those of us who are not beautiful? What does love-worthy mean under a colonial construction of love and beauty founded on white supremacy and colonialism? Under these systems, is reclaiming beauty radical or assimilationist? Does it mean something different for my fat, brown, queer, femme, body than it does for others? Who decides? And who are the ugly we are leaving behind?

"

— Caleb Luna, On Being Fat, Brown, Femme, Ugly, and Unloveable

July 21, 2014

wocinsolidarity:

Understand the Israeli – Palestinian Apartheid

(via gradientlair)

July 21, 2014
On Community Spaces and Being a Trans Muslim

"On Friday afternoons, we do our best to meet up somewhere in the city. Sometimes it’s my apartment, sometimes his; maybe the park if it’s nice out and we can find a space with some privacy. Privacy is important. We lay out a patchwork of blankets and sit in silence for a while, taking in the day or letting go of the week behind us, depending on what kind of week it’s been. After a while he pulls up a song on his phone, presses play, and sets it between us as we arrange ourselves. Shoulder to shoulder, facing Mecca, we focus quietly and listen to the call to prayer. We are a congregation of two – a tiny fraction of the Muslim Ummah, isolated by a culture of segregation and orthodoxy.

We’re the transgender Muslims of Chicago.”

July 21, 2014
frommadon:




Islamic Calendar



India, Deccan, 1891
Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper
Sheet: 15 3/8 x 22 1/2 in. (39.05 x 57.15 cm); Image: 13 5/8 x 20 7/8 in. (34.61 x 53.02 cm)
Indian Art Special Purpose Fund (M.89.21)
South and Southeast Asian Art

frommadon:

Islamic Calendar

India, Deccan, 1891
Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper
Sheet: 15 3/8 x 22 1/2 in. (39.05 x 57.15 cm); Image: 13 5/8 x 20 7/8 in. (34.61 x 53.02 cm)
Indian Art Special Purpose Fund (M.89.21)

(via massarrah)

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Filed under: queue 
July 21, 2014
ATTENTION HUMANITIES/SOCIAL SCIENCES/CRITICAL THEORY NERDS

jhameia:

annaham:

Duke University Press has around 1,600 of their academic titles available to read online FOR FREE on eDuke Books. You can search by title, author and/or subject! Here is their general list of subjects.

This is a fantastic option for students who need textbooks, research material(s), or individual chapters for various projects but who may not want to cart a ton of books around, need an iPad or browser-friendly format, don’t want to buy books for an intense markup only to get a few bucks back at the end of the semester—or, if you’re not a student but are interested in theory and such (hi). 

eDuke also adds new books sometimes, so keep checking back.

wwwwwooooooowwowowowowowowowoowowowow!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

University of California Press has about seven hundred e-books available to the public, as well.

(via medievalpoc)

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Filed under: books resources 
July 21, 2014

azizaesque:

Wazir Khan Masjid, Lahore’s old Walled City, Photographs by ||| Tammie

(via durenajaf)

July 20, 2014
"يبدو أننا لا نصلح لهذا العالم يا عمري. لا مكان لهشاشتنا. لقد فشلنا في كل شيء حتى في أن نحب أنفسنا قليلا"

— واسيني الأعرج (via schehrazad)

July 20, 2014

Read More

July 20, 2014
The Legion of Genders wants YOU!