September 19, 2014
brassmanticore:

Folio from a Diwan of Sultan Husayn Bayqara
Herat, Afghanistan, ca. 1490.
Written in Turkish, this folio is from a copy of the collected works of the last Timurid ruler, Sultan Husayn Bayqara (reigned 1470–1506), and is executed in a technique known as qata’i (decoupage). Instead of writing in ink, individual letters are cut out of different colored paper and pasted on a contrasting background. The art of decoupage, which originated in late-fifteenth-century Herat, required tremendous skill, dexterity, and imagination.
 - Freer Sackler Museum of Asian Art

brassmanticore:

Folio from a Diwan of Sultan Husayn Bayqara

Herat, Afghanistan, ca. 1490.

Written in Turkish, this folio is from a copy of the collected works of the last Timurid ruler, Sultan Husayn Bayqara (reigned 1470–1506), and is executed in a technique known as qata’i (decoupage). Instead of writing in ink, individual letters are cut out of different colored paper and pasted on a contrasting background. The art of decoupage, which originated in late-fifteenth-century Herat, required tremendous skill, dexterity, and imagination.

 - Freer Sackler Museum of Asian Art

September 19, 2014
"Can I chose my dreams so I don’t dream what can’t be fulfilled?"

— Mahmoud Darwish (via nizariat)

(via durenajaf)

September 19, 2014
farsizaban:

Isfahan, Iran

farsizaban:

Isfahan, Iran

(via durenajaf)

September 19, 2014

asylum-art:

Floating City Cardboard Sculpture by Nina Lindgren

Exposed to the Art Gallery Art Rebels in Copenhagen, “Floating City” is a cardboard sculpture created by a Swedish illustrator and designer Nina Lindgren. This incredible structure measuring about two meters of diameter and is made simply with cardboard and glue for a truly creative and unique result.

(via roachpatrol)

September 18, 2014
brassmanticore:

Gandan Khiid monastery, Ulan Baatar, Mongolia.

brassmanticore:

Gandan Khiid monastery, Ulan Baatar, Mongolia.

September 17, 2014
brassmanticore:

Folio from a Quran
Egypt, mid 14th century
Many fourteenth-century Korans include sumptuously illuminated double-page frontispieces, finispieces (end folios), and chapter headings that often combine floral motifs, geometric designs, and intricate arabesques. By this time, calligraphers favored a variety of cursive scripts for the body of the Koran, while the earlier kufic script was explored for its decorative qualities and primarily reserved for heading. Here, it is used for an ending— the last two verses of sura 9, known as Repentance.

brassmanticore:

Folio from a Quran

Egypt, mid 14th century

Many fourteenth-century Korans include sumptuously illuminated double-page frontispieces, finispieces (end folios), and chapter headings that often combine floral motifs, geometric designs, and intricate arabesques. By this time, calligraphers favored a variety of cursive scripts for the body of the Koran, while the earlier kufic script was explored for its decorative qualities and primarily reserved for heading. Here, it is used for an ending— the last two verses of sura 9, known as Repentance.

September 17, 2014
globalwarmist:

Earlier this year, London’s Tate Modern acquired “Sabra and Shatila Massacre” (1982-83), an epic mural-sized drawing by pioneering Iraqi artist Dia al-Azzawi. Sprawling as it is towering and engulfing, the artist began the massive work after news surfaced that between two and three thousand Palestinian and Lebanese civilians were strategically murdered in and around the refugee camps of southern Beirut in 1982. While creating “Sabra and Shatila Massacre,” al-Azzawi was also moved by Jean Genet’s “Four Hours in Shatila,” a written dispatch of the hell on earth that was the site of this civil-war era carnage, the violent details of which are impossible to take in without periodically searching for respite by turning away from the page.
- Dia al-Azzawi’s “Sabra and Shatila Massacre”

globalwarmist:

Earlier this year, London’s Tate Modern acquired “Sabra and Shatila Massacre” (1982-83), an epic mural-sized drawing by pioneering Iraqi artist Dia al-Azzawi. Sprawling as it is towering and engulfing, the artist began the massive work after news surfaced that between two and three thousand Palestinian and Lebanese civilians were strategically murdered in and around the refugee camps of southern Beirut in 1982. While creating “Sabra and Shatila Massacre,” al-Azzawi was also moved by Jean Genet’s “Four Hours in Shatila,” a written dispatch of the hell on earth that was the site of this civil-war era carnage, the violent details of which are impossible to take in without periodically searching for respite by turning away from the page.

- Dia al-Azzawi’s “Sabra and Shatila Massacre”

(via hummussexual)

September 17, 2014

shakethecobwebs:

recoveringfromcfs:

stanley-tsaii:

Just a set of quick photos I did for class.

Chronic illness 101.

oh hey look it’s my depression saying hello

(via queerjoys)

11:57am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zmcaau1R0Tt-C
  
Filed under: disability 
September 16, 2014
brassmanticore:

Winter palace of Mongolia’s eighth Living Buddha, and last king, Jebtzun Damba Hutagt VIII in Ulan Bataar, Mongolia.

brassmanticore:

Winter palace of Mongolia’s eighth Living Buddha, and last king, Jebtzun Damba Hutagt VIII in Ulan Bataar, Mongolia.

September 15, 2014

Thank you *hugs back*

September 15, 2014

thisiscaucasian:

Museum of National Applied Art, Sheki, Azerbaijan | Walter Callens

A late-19th-century Russian church in unusual cylindrical form, built on the site of a 6th-century Caucasian Albanian original now hosts the Museum of National Applied Art. It displays fairly haphazard collections of Sheki crafts, including metalwork, pottery, and embroidery.

(via isgandar)

September 15, 2014
brassmanticore:

Fragmentary Koran
Tunisia (probably) 9th century AD.
(In the J. Paul Getty Museum)

brassmanticore:

Fragmentary Koran

Tunisia (probably) 9th century AD.

(In the J. Paul Getty Museum)

September 15, 2014
brassmanticore:

Harem interior, Topkapi Palace, Istanbul.

brassmanticore:

Harem interior, Topkapi Palace, Istanbul.

September 15, 2014

Still in hospital. Today has not been a good day.

September 14, 2014
brassmanticore:

Hat ornament in the form of a salamander (16th-17th century) with cabochon emeralds and table-cut diamonds many of which are missing. This hat ornament is set in gold. There are two curved and overlapping pins at the back which were used for attachment. The tongue is missing. Part of the Cheapside Hoard.
Tudor and Jacobean hat jewels often expressed the sentiments or the sporting, spiritual and cultural interests of the wearer. The salamander had an emblematic significance since it was thought that it could pass through fire without harm by exuding a milky substance which moistened its skin.
Fashions in Renaissance jewellery were international and the salamander appears elsewhere, particularly in Spain and as here, in England.
(Museum of London)

brassmanticore:

Hat ornament in the form of a salamander (16th-17th century) with cabochon emeralds and table-cut diamonds many of which are missing. This hat ornament is set in gold. There are two curved and overlapping pins at the back which were used for attachment. The tongue is missing. Part of the Cheapside Hoard.

Tudor and Jacobean hat jewels often expressed the sentiments or the sporting, spiritual and cultural interests of the wearer. The salamander had an emblematic significance since it was thought that it could pass through fire without harm by exuding a milky substance which moistened its skin.

Fashions in Renaissance jewellery were international and the salamander appears elsewhere, particularly in Spain and as here, in England.

(Museum of London)

6:00pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zmcaau1QnpI5P
  
Filed under: jewellry queue